Technology

Using immunology to transform the infectious disease therapy space

‘Smart Immunology’

 

NovaBiotics’ proprietary technology platforms have been generated through rational drug design principles, using a ‘smart immunology’ approach.  These platforms are based on the body’s own infection-fighting innate immune defence molecules,  antimicrobial peptides and aminothiols.  These first responders of the immune system are cornerstones of the body’s defence against infection. Importantly, these biological weapons of immunity have evolved to function in a way that ensures no resistance can develop in the invading microbes they act on.  Our natural defence systems can sometimes fail or in cases where the immune system is suppressed, be depleted, leaving us much more prone to infection.  The antibacterial and antifungal therapy candidates we have developed from our platforms are ‘supercharged’ versions of these natural antimicrobials.  As such, our approach is to simply ‘put back’ therapeutic variants of these essential antimicrobial agents in patients who need them to combat infection.  The many benefits of this biology-led approach include:

  • Drug candidates with the same (understood) mechanism of action as their endogenous counterparts

  • Broad spectrum of activity

  • Activity agnostic of the antimicrobial resistance and metabolic status of target microbes

  • Mechanism of action prevents or mitigates drug resistance developing

  • Predicted Placebo-like safety-toxicology (no off-target pharmacology)

NovaBiotics’ antifungal and antibacterial drug candidates harnesses the beneficial properties of innate immune defence effector molecules but are synthetically generated, potent potential therapies for a range of fungal, bacterial and polymicrobial infections.  Our peptide and aminothiol based therapies have been designed to meet the urgent need for safer, more effective antimicrobials and address the various and well described shortcomings of conventional anti-infective therapies.  Perhaps most importantly, the mechanism of action of NovaBiotics’ peptides and aminothiols is such that they only recognise and act against microbes (not human cells) and then rapidly kill, not merely inhibit, target bacteria and fungi.  This minimises, if not negates, the likelihood of drug resistance developing and means NovaBiotics molecules have much better predicted safety profiles than many existing classes of antimicrobial therapy, particularly antifungals.